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Let Nature Be Your Guide: Graphic Design of the Arts & Crafts and Art Nouveau Movements

The nineteenth century gave us the wonders of the Industrial Revolution, but also ugly urban landscapes and soulless mechanization. By the end of the century, designers such as William Morris, Eugene Grasset, and Alphonse Mucha were going “back to nature”

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Award, Promotion for Libraries Faculty Member Judy Bolton

Judy Bolton, Head of Public Services in Special Collections, was promoted to Senior General Librarian effective January 1, 2015.  In addition, Bolton, who has been with LSU Libraries for just over thirty years, was also recently awarded the first Friends

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Bird’s-Eye History: 17th-Century French City Views

Just because people 400 years ago didn’t have the interactive mapping tools that we have today doesn’t mean they didn’t know what faraway places looked like. By the 1600s, several large collections of city views, accompanied by detailed descriptions, had

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Aaron Richardson, University Archivist

Aaron Richardson

On January 5, 2015, Aaron Richardson joined the LSU Libraries as University Archivist. Aaron comes to LSU from Atlanta, GA where he served as Southeast Regional Archivist for the National Park Service. A NARA-certified Records Manager, Aaron helped implement the

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The Science of Sugar: Audubon Park Sugar School and Experiment Station

Sugar students at work and eating sugarcane, November 1902. Audubon Sugar School, New Orleans.]

Sugar and the scientific investigation of its cultivation and manufacture played a major part in the early development of LSU. The Audubon Sugar School and Experiment Station was one of the first American research facilities developed for the scientific investigation

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Extension Before Extension: The Origins of Demonstration Work at LSU

Louisiana demonstration train group photograph.

In celebration of the 100th anniversary of the Smith-Lever Act, LSU Libraries Special Collections has put together an exhibit detailing the agricultural origins of LSU, and the university’s involvement in the evolution of the Louisiana Cooperative Extension Service, 1914-2014. The

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General Middleton and the Battle of the Bulge

Gen. Middleton, December 1944.  Winter weather in the Ardennes is exceptionally cold and wet, and the battle was characterized by fog, freezing temperatures, misty rain, snow, and ice.

  Troy Middleton, president emeritus of LSU and for whom the main library on campus is named, was a division and corps commander in World War II. The most important battle in which he led troops was the Battle of

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Bringing the Christmas Tree to Louisiana

NOLAtree2

Even as far south as Louisiana, winter nights are long and chilly, but in homes all across the state, Christmas trees bring a little light and joy. When did the tradition of decorating evergreens during the darkest days of winter

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Tom Turkey, Transatlantic Traveler

Eleazar Albin, A Natural History of Birds (1731)

Even if you won’t be roasting a turkey at Thanksgiving later this week, there’s no denying that this iconic bird has become part of the American story. Other than on “Turkey Day” itself, however, is eating turkeys as uniquely American

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Afternoon in the Archives: Dante and Chaucer

Join the LSU Libraries’ Special Collections on December 1 and 2 for our first “Afternoon in the Archives,” an informal series of showcases designed to help you learn more about our exciting collections.  The theme of the first event will

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Bringing the Middle Ages to Life in Special Collections

Special Collections has seen a record-breaking number of class visits this semester. Several of those classes, including Professor Maribel Dietz’s course on the Late Middle Ages, came to use our large and growing collection of medieval manuscript facsimiles. The materials

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Pocketbook Patriotism: Advertising and the First World War

Wilfred Owen, one of the greatest poets of World War I, asserted that if everyone could experience the brutality of war for themselves, we “would not tell with such high zest / To children ardent for some desperate glory, /

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Public Services Desk: (225) 578-6544


Reference Desk: (225) 578-6568


Fax: (225) 578-9425


Email: special@lsu.edu


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  • Our second "Afternoon in the Archives" will be on Feb. 3 & 4. Stop by and view some materials from our exciting historical collections and talk with us about how we can be part of your teaching, learning, and research!


    Let Nature Be Your Guide: Graphic Design of the Arts & Crafts and Art Nouveau Movements
    news.blogs.lib.lsu.edu
    The nineteenth century gave us the wonders of the Industrial Revolution, but also ugly urban landscapes and soulless mechanization. By the end of the century, designers such as William Morris, Euge...
  • Stop by the West Baton Rouge Museum to visit their new exhibit "Brave Steps: The Louisiana Native Guard," featuring documents and images from Special Collections related to these black troops' experiences at the Battle of Port Hudson.


    Brave Steps: The Louisiana Native Guard: January 17 through March 20
    westbatonrougemuseum.com
    The West Baton Rouge Museum hosts Brave Steps: The Louisiana Native Guard, which opens January 17, 2015 and runs through to March 22, 2015 to help ma...
  • #TBT Today’s image is Jacob Schlessinger’s Chain Survey of the University Campus completed in January of 1908. Schlessinger was a sophomore from Avoyelles Parish majoring in civil engineering. Chain surveys were used to establish horizontal distances along compass sightlines in surveying land for legal and commercial purposes. One chain equals 66 feet and consists of 100 links measuring 7.92 inches each, or .66 feet.

    For those who may not know, the “University Campus” was located in downtown Baton Rouge on the grounds where the new state capitol stands today. This was LSU’s home from 1887 to 1925, although the move to our present campus wasn’t completed until 1931 because some University functions continued to take place here. Several of the buildings including the Pentagon Barracks made up the United States Military Post from the 1820s to 1861 when it was seized by Confederate forces at the beginning of the Civil War. Federal forces reclaimed the post in 1862 and after the war it was used sparingly by the US Army. In 1884, the state of Louisiana was granted the right to use the post and it was turned over to LSU. Most of the buildings on the east side of University Avenue (now North Third Street) were torn down between 1930 and 1934 to make way for the capitol grounds. The Pentagon Barracks and the arsenal (not shown on this map) are the only buildings that survived.

    Source: Office of Facility Services Records, RG # A0204, Louisiana State University Archives, LSU Libraries, Baton Rouge, LA. This and other maps of campus can be found in the LSU University Archives Print Materials Collection in the Louisiana Digital Library: http://cdm16313.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/landingpage/collection/p120701coll24


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