News & Notes

Retracing Louisiana’s Roots: Exploring the State’s Hispanic/Latinx Heritage

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Retracing Louisiana’s Roots: Exploring the State’s Hispanic/Latinx Heritage, presented by LSU Libraries’ Diversity Committee and LSU Latinx Faculty, will be on display in the Middleton Library second floor lobby from Sept. 16 through Oct. 18.

This display celebrates Hispanic and Latinx influences in Louisiana by revisiting the state’s colonial past and exploring its cultural legacy. It provides an account of how Louisiana’s Hispanic history has connections, parallels and similarities, confluences, and affinities with Latin America. The display is also supplemented with resources to assist those wanting to learn more through the libraries’ collections as well as informational flyers to learn more about organizations serving the Latinx and Hispanic community in Louisiana. It also coincides with a speaker series put on by LSU Latinx Faculty and Staff Caucus. The speaker series includes:

The Resurgence of Spanish in Louisiana

Panelists: Rafael Orozco, PhD | Foreign Languages & Literatures

Dorian Dorado, PhD | Foreign Languages & Literatures

When: 9/18, 12:00-1:00 in Hill Memorial Lecture Hall

Summary: This presentation explores the resurgence of Spanish in the state of Louisiana whose patrimonial Spanish varieties, together with those in New Mexico, are among the oldest found in the United States. In the aftermath of hurricane Katrina, Louisiana’s Hispanic population experienced an unprecedented increase which has resulted in the revival of the Spanish language after a steady decline during the 20th century. Today the influence of Spanish and the Hispanic culture are marked throughout the Pelican State, from its authentic cuisine to newly emerged Spanish-language media. We explore quantitatively and qualitatively sociolinguistic patterns among the newly arrived Spanish speakers in Louisiana (mainly Central Americans) focusing on calques, variable subject pronoun expression, the expression of futurity, and forms of address. In addition, we carry out an extensive investigation on the perceptual attitudes toward Spanish in Louisiana. Such perceptions of Louisiana natives toward Spanish reveal positive evaluations of Peninsular, Mexican and Argentinean Spanish whereas Central American and Caribbean varieties are evaluated negatively. Interestingly, Louisianans’ perceptions are congruent with those in several speech communities throughout the Hispanic World and reveal important information about Spanish-speakers’ identity. Although Spanish in the United States has been extensively researched, there is a limited number of studies on Spanish in Louisiana. Thus, our study provides a descriptive analysis of a brand-new manifestation of Spanish and its speakers as well as the linguistic and cultural impact that they have on 21st-century Louisiana. In sum, our investigation fills an existing gap in research on Spanish in the United States and sociolinguistic studies while opening new research paths.

Anti-Bilingualism in the U.S. & its Impact on Latinx

Panelists: Alejandra S. Torres – PhD Candidate | English

Denitza Duran – Master’s Student | Hispanic Studies

Jacqueline Oquendo – PhD Student | Mass Communication

When: 9/24, 12:00-1:00 in Hill Memorial Lecture Hall

Summary: The shaming experienced by Latinx for either not speaking English well enough, and/or not speaking Spanish to a certain standard is real. Playing a majorly politicized role, language is often tied to identity, educational opportunities, and cultural preservation or assimilationist pressures. This event presents a brief overview on Spanish/English bilingualism in the U.S. Three Latinx panelists discuss how anti-bilingual sentiment impacts their lives.

Fourteen Days that Rocked Puerto Rico

Panelists: Rosa M. Lázaro – PhD Candidate | History

Erick J. Padilla – Master’s Student | Philosophy

Pedro L. Ramos – PhD Candidate | History

When: 10/9, 12:00-1:00 in Hill Memorial Lecture Hall

Summary: During the summer of 2019, hundreds of private chat messages between the governor of Puerto Rico and his inner circle were leaked (an event known as Telegramgate or Chatgate). Glaringly, the contents showed pronounced lack of sympathy for the victims of Hurricane Maria and derogatory comments about women. In response, the Puerto Rican population galvanized to protest decades of government-led mismanagement and social oppressions they have endured. After two weeks of rigorous protesting (across the island and abroad), Governor Ricardo Rosselló was forced out of office

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Events

Recent Faculty Publications

2019

Comeaux, Dave;  Emily Frank; and Mike Waugh. “Supporting Student Success: E-books as Course Materials,” CODEX: Journal of the Louisiana Chapter of the ACRL. Volume 5, Issue 2 (Fall/Winter 2019).

Haber, Natalie, Melissa Cornwell, & Andrea Hebert. “This worksheet works: Making the DLS Standards work for you.” College & Research Libraries News

Lounsberry, Megan. “No Textbooks Allowed! (Unless You’re a Graduate Student!): Louisiana State University Pilots an ILL Textbook Service. Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery & Electronic Reserve.

Miles, John David. “Colfax, Kate Grant, and the Domestication of Reconstruction’s Violence,” Civil War Book Review. Volume 21, Issue 2 (Spring 2019).

Miles, John David. “The Loyalty of West Point’s Graduates Debated,” Civil War Book Review. Volume 21, Issue 1 (Winter 2019).

Miller, Marty. “Curriculum, Departmental, and Faculty Mapping in the Visual Arts Department,” Art Documentation, Volume 38, p 159-173 Issue 1 (March 2019).

O’Neill, Brittany; and  Allen LeBlanc. “Evaluating Trends in Instruction Scheduling Management: A Survey of Louisiana’s Academic Libraries,” CODEX: Journal of the Louisiana Chapter of the ACRL. Volume 5, Issue 2 (Fall/Winter 2019).

Russo, Michael, “The Moon Belongs to Everyone:  ResearchGate and Subscription Databases Compared.”  Louisiana Libraries. Winter 2019 (v. 81, no. 3).

Russo, Michael, “Information Literacy through Service Learning”  in Library Collaborations and Community Partnerships: Enhancing Health and Quality of Life.  Fannie M. Cox, Henry R. Cunningham, and Vickie Hines-Martin, eds., 2019.

Simms, Sarah; Hayley Johnson. “Hidden in Plain Sight,” 64 Parishes (Magazine of the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities). Issue 4, Summer 2019. https://64parishes.org/hidden-in-plain-sight

Simms, S., & Johnson, H. (2019). Subtle activism: Using the library exhibit as a social justice tool. Alexandria. https://doi.org/10.1177/0955749019876119

Ziegler, Scott; and Cara Key. “More Than a Pretty Interface: The Louisiana Digital Library as a Data Hub,” CODEX: Journal of the Louisiana Chapter of the ACRL. Volume 5, Issue 2 (Fall/Winter 2019).

2018

Hebert, Andrea. “Information Literacy Skills of First-Year Library and Information Science Graduate Students: An Exploratory Study,” Evidence Based Library and Information Practice Volume 13, Issue 3 (September 2018).

Miller, Marty. “Sacred vs. Profane in The Great War: A Neutral’s Indictment: Louis Raemaekers’s Use of Religious Imagery in Adoration of the Magi and Our Lady of Antwerp.” Catholic Library World, vol. 89, no. 1, Sept. 2018, pp. 20–32.

Rasmussen, Hans. “The Life and Death of Raquette in Nineteenth-Century New Orleans,” Sport History Review 49 (May 2018): 23-38.

Wilder, Stanley. “Delayed Retirements and the Youth Movement among ARL Library Professionals,” Research Library Issues, no. 295 (2018).

Wilder, Stanley. “Hiring and Staffing Trends in ARL Libraries,” Research Library Issues, no. 295 (2018).

Wilder, Stanley. “Selected Demographic Trends in the ARL Professional Population,” Research Library Issues, no. 295 (2018).

Ziegler, Scott; and Richard Shrake. “PAL: Toward a Recommendation System for Manuscripts,” Information Technology and Libraries, Vol. 37, No. 3 (2018).

2017

Caminita, C.; Cook, M.; and Paster, A. (2017). Thirty years of preserving, discovering, and accessing U.S. agricultural information: Past progress and current challenges. Library Trends, 65(3), 293-315.

Dauterive, Sarah; John Bourgeois; and Sarah Simms. “How little is too little? An examination of information literacy instruction duration for freshmen.” Journal of Information Literacy, 11.1 (2017): 204-219.

Fontenot, Mitch; Emily Frank; and Andrea Hebert. “Going Where the Users Are: Three Variations on a Theme,” Louisiana Libraries, Fall 2017.

Hawk, Amanda K. “Highflying Crowdfunding: Creating a Successful Partnership with a Campus Donor,” Archival Outlook, July/August 2017: 12-13, 19. https://www.bluetoad.com/publication/?i=422988.

Hebert, Andrea; and Marty Miller. (2017). Using FSA-OWI photographs to teach information and visual literacy. Louisiana Libraries, 79(3), 19–25.

Johnson, Hayley. “#NoDAPL: Social Media, Empowerment, and Civic Participation at Standing Rock,” Library Trends, Fall 2017.

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