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Exhibition: “From Grand Village to Bluff City: 300 Years of Natchez History”

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The Mississippi River’s fertile flood plain coupled with its role as a major economic artery connecting north and south firmly established the links between Natchez, Miss., and Louisiana early in their development as outposts of the colonial empires of multiple European powers. That connection continued into their respective American territorial periods, and by the antebellum era planters in the area had fully exploited this geographic partnership, taking up residence in Natchez city proper while keeping a firm eye on their profitable plantations across the river. Joined more than divided by the river, Natchez and Louisiana continue to have social, cultural, and economic ties.

In exploration of these enduring connections and in recognition of the tri-centennial of Natchez, LSU Libraries Special Collections presents the exhibition “From Grand Village to Bluff City: 300 Years of Natchez History, on display at Hill Memorial Library from June 13 – September 3, 2016. It is free and open to the public.

The exhibition showcases rare books, manuscripts, and 19th century photographs and examines the Natchez Indians; Natchez’s multi-national colonial past; the territorial and early statehood period; political and economic history; slavery, Civil War and Reconstruction; Natchez in the New South; 20th century economic development and the civil rights era; literary notables of Natchez; and the development of Natchez tourism.

“From Grand Village to Bluff City” reflects the diverse materials, stories and people of Natchez found among Special Collections’ holdings. “Why,” you may ask “does an institution in Louisiana have so much history about Natchez.” According to Tara Laver, Head of Public and Research Services and co-curator of the exhibit, “Historically, the political boundaries between Louisiana and southwest Mississippi were less important than their common experience, borne largely of their abiding relationship with the Mississippi River. Indeed, these associations informed LSU history professor Edwin Adams Davis as he began in 1935 systematically to collect the papers of the families that settled and prospered in the region.”

These materials became the foundation for the Louisiana and Lower Mississippi Valley Collections (LLMVC) within LSU Libraries Special Collections, one of the nation’s premier repositories of historical documents materials relating to the antebellum plantation, Civil War, and Reconstruction South.

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On Display

Made in New Orleans: The Past in Print  –  Main Gallery

John Earle Uhler Papers  –  Reading Room

In the News

Made in New Orleans
“Hill Memorial Library showcases ‘Made in New Orleans: The Past in Print’,” The Daily Reveille

Made in New Orleans
On exhibit: ‘Made in New Orleans’ at LSU Hill Memorial Library, March 19-June 8,” inRegister

Letterform Characters
“Hill Memorial Library exhibit explores history of typeface,”  The Daily Reveille

Through the Valley of Death
“Hill Memorial Library debuts WWI exhibit,” The Daily Reveille

Investigating Sherlock
“LSU’s Hill Memorial hosts Sherlock Holmes exhibit,” The Daily Reveille

Jazz Fest 101: A Showcase of Student Oral History Research
“Hill Memorial Library displays ‘Jazz Fest 101,’ explores festival’s past,” The Daily Reveille

A Voyage to the Floating World: Japanese Illustrated Books and East-West Cultural Exchange in the Nineteenth Century
“On Exhibit: A Voyage to the Floating World,” inRegister

Advancing Scholarship & Learning for 80 Years: LSU Press and The Southern Review
“Hill Memorial Library Displays History of LSU Press, Southern Review,” The Daily Reveille

A la Militaire” – The Battle of New Orleans
“Hill Memorial opens ‘A la Militaire,'” The Daily Reveille

Cooperative Extension at LSU
“AgCenter: Louisiana resource for 100 years,”
The Advertiser


I Remember: An Art Show of Environmental Significance
“Time for oil and gas industry to come to the table on coastal restoration,” BR Business Report

The Relentless Pursuit of “Equal”
“Integration Exhibit Opens,” LSU Daily Reveille

Centuries of Style
“Style Stories,” The Advocate

“Clothing as Social History,” nola.com

Of Kin & Cane
LSU Daily Reveille

Blacks in the Red Stick
LSU Daily Reveille

Louisiana for Bibliophiles
The Advocate

Change(less): Photography and the Ephemeral Made Permanent
DIG Magazine

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Hebert, Andrea. “Information Literacy Skills of First-Year Library and Information Science Graduate Students: An Exploratory Study,” Evidence Based Library and Information Practice Volume 13, Issue 3 (September 2018).

Miller, Marty. “Sacred vs. Profane in The Great War: A Neutral’s Indictment: Louis Raemaekers’s Use of Religious Imagery in Adoration of the Magi and Our Lady of Antwerp.” Catholic Library World, vol. 89, no. 1, Sept. 2018, pp. 20–32.

Wilder, Stanley. “Delayed Retirements and the Youth Movement among ARL Library Professionals,” Research Library Issues, no. 295 (2018).

Ziegler, Scott. “PAL: Toward a Recommendation System for Manuscripts,” Information Technology and Libraries, Vol. 37, No. 3 (2018).

2017

Caminita, C., Cook, M., & Paster, A. (2017). Thirty years of preserving, discovering, and accessing U.S. agricultural information: Past progress and current challenges. Library Trends, 65(3), 293-315.

Dauterive, Sarah, John Bourgeois, & Sarah Simms. “How little is too little? An examination of information literacy instruction duration for freshmen.” Journal of Information Literacy, 11.1 (2017): 204-219.

Fontenot, Mitch. “Going Where the Users Are: Three Variations on a Theme,” Louisiana Libraries, Fall 2017.

Johnson, Hayley. “#NoDAPL: Social Media, Empowerment, and Civic Participation at Standing Rock,” Library Trends, Fall 2017.

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Public Services Desk: (225) 578-6544

Reference Desk: (225) 578-6568

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Email: special@lsu.edu

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