News & Notes

Second Floor Computer Lab Closes

Posted in Announcements

Last spring, the Student Technology Fee Committee announced a decision to close the ITS-run computer lab on the second floor of Middleton Library. Students returning in the fall will have roomy area for studying and plugging in. The computer lab on the first floor of Middleton Library is not subject to the closure.

The Reveille reported that the decision came after the committee, which is composed of students and faculty, conducted a survey that indicated 90 percent of students own laptops on campus. Specialized software that was previously only available in computer labs, is now accessible 24/7 through the VLab, an on-line virtual lab that allows students to log in and access software on their own computers.

Students without laptops can check one out at the Middleton Library circulation desk through Gear 2 Geaux, funded by the student technology fee. Dell laptops, Apple MacBooks, iPads, clickers, chargers, and other technology are popular items to check out at Middleton Library.

Further plans for the space on the second floor are being considered by Middleton Library staff.

 

Sigrid Kelsey is the Director of Library Communications and Publications at the LSU Libraries.

Posted in Announcements

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