News & Notes

“Meet Your Librarian Day” Swamps the LSU Campus

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Meet Your Librarian Day

On September 4, over 20 librarians and library associates volunteered at five sites throughout the LSU campus for “Meet Your Librarian Day.” The purpose of the event is to promote the Libraries’ “Subject Specialists,” librarians who specialize in particular topics. These librarians can can assist students with research and projects, guest lecture in courses, and acquire books and resources for the libraries in their respective subject areasMeet Your Librarian Day

The five sites were the Middleton Library lobby, Patrick F. Taylor Hall, Design Building, LSU Student Union, and the Business Education Complex. Volunteers for each of the five sites talked to students and faculty, distributed general and specific information and literature, and introduced students to the services a subject librarian can provide.  More than 900 students and faculty contacts were made by the library representatives at the five sites during this time period.

Students and faculty can find out who their subject librarian is by going to the LSU Libraries’ website “Subject Specialists” page here.  The librarians’ contact information can be found there, and subject-specific library resources can be found by clicking on a particular subject name.

Paul Hrycaj is a Research & Instruction Librarian at the LSU Libraries.

Posted in Announcements

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