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LSU Libraries Welcomes Art and Design Librarian Marty Miller

Posted in Announcements, People

Marty Miller has joined the LSU Libraries faculty as Art and Design Librarian. She earned an M.A. in art history, a Master’s of Library Science, and a B.A. in art, all from the University of Kansas. Marty’s first love has always been art and architecture. It was while working toward her M.A. in art history that she was a student worker in the University of Kansas’s Murphy Art and Architecture Library and decided to pursue a second master’s in library science.

Marty began her library career as an archival intern at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art Archives, while working part-time at the Spencer Art Research Library. When the archives were moved to the library, she became Librarian Assistant I/Archival. She has also been the Library Media Specialist at St. Teresa’s Academy in Kansas City, Missouri, and a Reference Librarian at Metropolitan Community College (MCC) – Longview Campus. Also at MCC, she taught art history survey and library research courses, both online and face to face.

Marty has studied Russian language, both at Johnson County College in Overland Park, Kansas, and at Moscow State University for two weeks in 2010, and Spanish at the Universidad Nacional in Cuernavaca, Mexico. She has traveled to Dublin, Ireland, to participate in a marathon (walking rather than running), which was a fundraising event for MCC. Most recently, her travels took her to Uganda on a faculty trip, which included white water rafting on the Nile, chimpanzee and gorilla tracking in Bwindi National Park, several safaris and boat trips. The itinerary took her across the equator twice and provided a somewhat close encounter between her boat and a “crocodile the size of a small Sauropod!”

Marty (left) with colleague Alice Daugherty at "Meet Your Librarian Day"

Marty (left) with colleague Alice Daugherty at “Meet Your Librarian Day”

“My new position at LSU gives me the opportunity to focus on serving art and architecture research needs of students and faculty at all levels,” says Marty, “I currently write reviews for CHOICE magazine, a peer-reviewed library journal, so I’m looking forward to furthering the advancement of art librarianship through more extensive research and publication.” She is fascinated by the history and culture of Louisiana, and is looking forward to learning more about it, including zydeco music, which she will be learning how to dance to through the leisure class program.

Marty has attended the American Library Association (ALA) Annual Conference, the Missouri Library Association (MLA) annual conference, and Brick and Click Library Symposium at Northwest Missouri State, and presented at the last two. She served as member-at-large on the MLA board for two years and headed the Publication Committee for the 2012 MLA conference. She has also served the Missouri Association of College and Research Libraries division as recorder, vice-chair and chair. She was fortunate to serve as a library delegate for People to People Ambassador Programs’ Russian Libraries’ delegation in 2007, and she is now looking forward to getting involved with the Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS-NA) and the Louisiana Library Association.

Sigrid Kelsey is the Director of Library Communications and Publications at the LSU Libraries.

Posted in Announcements, People

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  • Today is the 45th anniversary of the shooting of anti-Vietnam War protesters at Kent State University. LSU had a protest of its own in response to the shootings and here is its story.

    Students at LSU in the 1960s were certainly aware of such issues as civil rights, the Vietnam War, and the growing concern for the environment, but in contrast to what was happening at some other college campuses at this time, LSU’s student body was rather conservative. Protests on campus were rare and when they did occur, they were, with a few exceptions, very small and confined to Free Speech Alley. On May 4, 1970, students at Kent State University held a protest against the expansion of the Vietnam War into Cambodia and were fired upon by members of the Ohio National Guard. Four students were killed and nine others were wounded.

    On May 8, 1970, LSU joined more than 1,250 colleges in protesting the shootings. This was the largest antiwar protest ever held at LSU and was preceded by three days of vigils and speeches in solidarity with the students of Kent State. An estimated 1,000 students and faculty took part in a march that went from the Parade Ground up Nicholson Drive to the Old State Capitol. Marchers walked, rode bicycles, and were accompanied by a van carrying first aid supplies and water in case of emergency. March organizers obtained a parade permit and the Baton Rouge City Police brought up the rear of the procession.

    Upon arriving at the Old State Capitol, several speakers, including Student Government president Colley Joseph, English instructor Richard Borman, and chemistry professor Joel Selbin, urged the marchers to continue to make their voices heard and that peaceful protest was one of America’s oldest and finest traditions. The march ended with a prayer for peace led by Rev. Phil Kapela of the Catholic Student Center.

    Some on campus were either for escalating the war or thought that the Student Government Association should stay out of the discussion. The SGA passed two resolutions, one condemning US involvement in Cambodia, the other publically declaring that the SGA shares the grief of the students at Kent State University, as well as grieving over the recent suicide of SGA president Art Ensminger. A petition was circulated, drawing an estimated 1,000 names, saying that the SGA should not pass resolutions regarding US foreign policy. But, support grew for ending the war along with more student activism for women’s rights, environmental issues, and lowering the voting age from 21 to 18. #May4Matters

    Photo source: Office of Public Relations Records, RG #A0020, Louisiana State University Archives, LSU Libraries, Baton Rouge, LA

    Document source: Student Government Association Records, RG #A5500, Louisiana State University Archives, LSU Libraries, Baton Rouge, LA.


  • Tomorrow is Free Comic Book Day!
    But did you know that you can always come and look at some amazing comics at Hill Memorial Library for free any day! The William Morton Bowlus Collection of Comic Books is just one of the many exciting surprises you can find at Hill!

    A new exhibition will open on June 22, 2015 to celebrate our Comics and other illustrated collections. Mark your calendars for Graphic Sensibility: Selected Comics & Illustrations from DC to Dürer! Coming soon!


  • #TBT On this day in 1926, dedication ceremonies began for LSU’s new campus. Called the “greater university,” it actually opened in time for the start of the 1925 fall semester. Several dates in 1925 were suggested for the ceremonies, but construction delays and the desire to have students on campus pushed the date to April 30, which is also the date, in 1812, that Louisiana was admitted to the Union.

    The festivities began at 9:45 AM with an academic procession from Hill Memorial Library to the Memorial Tower led by LSU Pres. Thomas Boyd and followed by the speakers, members of the LSU Board of Supervisors, guests, faculty, invited delegates from other universities, and alumni. At 10 AM, the formal dedication ceremonies began in front of the Memorial Tower featuring an address by Gen. Robert Lee Bullard, who came as Pres. Calvin Coolidge’s representative, and the dedication of the Memorial Tower to Louisiana soldiers and sailors who were lost in World War I. At 2 PM in the Greek Theatre, Thomas Boyd (standing at the podium) welcomed the assembled delegates from other universities, members of the Movement for a Greater Agricultural College, and those who enacted the constitutional and statutory provisions that established the “greater university.” Others on the platform were, left to right, A.B. Dinwiddy, president of Tulane University, T.H. Harris, state superintendent of education, Charles A. Holcombe, state senator from Baton Rouge, Father F.L. Gassler of St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, former governor John M. Parker, widely regarded as the father of the “greater university;” and Edward J. Gay, former US senator and chairman of the LSU Board of Supervisors’ Building Committee. The Stanacola Refinery Band (now Exxon) gave a concert at 5 PM in the Greek Theatre featuring several selections including the overture from William Tell and John Phillip Sousa’s Semper Fidelis.

    Saturday, May 1 featured a public inspection and tours of the new campus, and alumni luncheon, a track and field meet between LSU and Tulane, and an “old-fashioned Southern barbecue” at the Indian Mounds. The dedication ceremonies ended on Sunday, May 2 following a “dedication sacred service” in the Greek Theatre. Below is a link to the dedication program that gives the entire slate of activities:
    http://www.louisianadigitallibrary.org/cdm/ref/collection/p120701coll24/id/58.

    Happy 89th birthday to the Baton Rouge campus!

    Photo source: Office of the Chancellor Records, RG #A0001, Louisiana State University Archives, LSU Libraries, Baton Rouge, LA.


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