News & Notes

LSU Libraries Welcomes Emily Frank

Posted in Announcements, People

LSU Libraries welcomes Emily Frank, our new Instructional Technologies and Engineering Librarian.

Emily arrived in Louisiana after completing the International Master’s in Digital Library Learning program, for which she received a full scholarship and stipend from the European Union. While living in Oslo to participate in the program, she attended national conferences, including one on open data within the Norwegian Meteorological Institute and one on knowledge organization. She also attended TPDL – the International Conference on Theory and Practice of Digital Libraries – in Berlin, Germany, in 2011. Emily has experience as a grants manager at the University of Kentucky’s Hazard Mitigation Grant Program administering FEMA grants in the state. Her duties involved working with professionals from emergency management and engineering on plans and projects related to hazard identification and mitigation. During her time there, she was elected as a board member to the Kentucky Association of Mitigation Managers.

Engineering and Instructional Technologies Librarian Emily Frank

Engineering and Instructional Technologies Librarian Emily Frank

She has also completed an internship at the Scientific Information Service at CERN – the European Organization for Nuclear Research. It was after her work at CERN, where she offered support to the physicists, engineers, and computer scientists working there, that she sought a position that would allow her to continue to work with STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) disciplines and in a research-extensive environment. As the Subject Specialist for Engineering and Computer Science at LSU, she is able to do that. And as the Instructional Technologies Librarian, she is able to apply her knowledge and experience with digital tools and emerging technologies.

Emily says that she is “excited to contribute to the user-centered research and instruction services offered by the LSU Libraries. One of my focuses is on finding ways technology can enhance and extend these services. Within the College of Engineering, I’m looking forward to supporting and collaborating with the students and faculty. I see many opportunities for this, including working within Patrick F. Taylor Hall and the Engineering Residential College.”

She is also looking forward to living in Baton Rouge. On her first visit here, she was struck by the friendly community and LSU’s beautiful campus. This is her first time living south of Kentucky, and she looks forward to exploring this part of the country and, of course, the food. Emily loves to travel and has visited 32 countries and lived in 7, at one time teaching English at a university in Lille, France, through the French Ministry of Education.

Emily’s previous library experience includes working at Butler University’s Irwin Library during her undergraduate education, and at two branches of the Lexington Public Library in Lexington, KY, including one that was bilingual (English-Spanish).

Welcome, Emily!

Sigrid Kelsey is the Director of Library Communications and Publications at the LSU Libraries.

Posted in Announcements, People

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