News & Notes

The Dear Ones at Home

Posted in Exhibitions, Special Collections Tagged with: ,

LSU Libraries Special Collections presents the exhibition “The Dear Ones at Home: Women’s Letters and Diaries of the Civil War Era,” December 6, 2010 – April 30, 2011 at Hill Memorial Library.  Marking the sesquicentennial of the Civil War, which started April 12, 1861, the exhibition explores the variety of women’s experiences during the war and its impact on their worlds.

Drawing on the rich manuscript holdings of the Louisiana and Lower Mississippi Valley Collections, “The Dear Ones at Home” reveals what life was like on the home front, as women as well as men mobilized for the war.   The exhibition displays photographs from the collections, including a daguerreotype of Varina Howell Davis, as well as illustrations from Harper’s Weekly.

Letters and diaries written by women at the time show how, as nurses, and home front organizers, they supported or hindered the Confederate effort. As sweethearts and wives, they used their powers of affection to compel or dissuade men to serve.  On April 14, 1862, Amelia Faulkner of Faulkland Plantation in Louisiana wrote to her friend Henrietta Lauzin of Baton Rouge that “girls ought to have nothing but soldiers for their beaux and if all girls thought as we do, there would be more companies leave this state.” But that same year, Mary Pugh, of Lafourche Parish wrote to her husband Richard “you have done enough now to satisfy yourself and everyone else so come now if only for the sake of your little wife.”

Documents show how women faced the perils of battle and occupation.  In a letter to a female friend, J. Young Sanders Jr, wrote. “My gentle friend, never come in contact with the enemy’s brutal soldiering, if it is avoidable. ..but flee them as you would a hideous pestilence.  They wage war upon women and feeble old men.” Ann Wilkinson Penrose’s diary records her fury when the Federals came to arrest her father in New Orleans: “My blood boiled, I felt possessed with fury, … I made my way down as fast as I could with my crutches … I felt as if I could strike them to the ground.”

Additional items reflect women’s political attitudes and their reactions to the end of war and slavery.

Prepared by LSU Curator of Manuscripts Tara Laver and Exhibitions Coordinator Leah Jewett, the exhibition explores how women responded and adjusted, or not, to wartime changes in the customs of courtship and marriage, death and mourning, women’s work and gender roles, and religious observance and faith, as well as race relations.   Manuscript reminiscences of the war years and contemporary and modern published works of fiction and non-fiction are featured, including several antebellum pieces by African American women writers.

Also on display is a complete set of prints from artist Edwin Forbes’s Life Studies of the Great Army (1890). Forbes travelled with the Union army, sketching images of camp life as a special correspondent for the contemporary publication Frank Leslie’s Illustrated News. After the war he completed etchings based on his war-time sketches, compiling them for his work Life Studies.

In association with the exhibition, as part of Women’s History Month, Alecia P. Long, LSU Assistant Professor of History, will give a talk titled “(Mis)Remembering General Order No. 28: Benjamin Butler, the Woman Order, and Historical Memory” at noon on March 2, 2011 in the Hill Memorial Library lecture hall.

The exhibition and lecture are free and open to the public.

Exhibitions Coordinator, LSU Libraries Special Collections
http://exhibitions.blogs.lib.lsu.edu

Posted in Exhibitions, Special Collections Tagged with: ,

On Display

We Built This City: Baton Rouge as a System of Systems – Main Gallery

Who’s Your Holmes?: Depictions and Adaptations of Sherlock Holmes and The Hound of the BaskervillesLecture Hall Gallery

Joseph Watson Correspondence – Reading Room

Coming Soon:
Galileo's illustrations of the moon, in Institutio Astronomica, 1653On the Moon: Commemorating the Lunar Landing & the Year 1969 (on Earth) with Rare Books, Literary Works, & Contemporary Collections
opens March 25, 2019, Main Gallery

Online exhibitions

In the News

Who’s Your Holmes?
“On exhibit: Who’s Your Holmes? at LSU’s Hill Memorial Library” inRegister

Seeing and the “Eye of the Imagination”
“Take a peek into the unknown through Clarence John Laughlin’s ‘eye of the imagination’ at Hill Memorial Library” The Advocate

Seeing and the “Eye of the Imagination”
“Book collection marks historic importance of fantasy, horror genres” The Daily Reveille

Made in New Orleans
“Hill Memorial Library showcases ‘Made in New Orleans: The Past in Print’,” The Daily Reveille

Made in New Orleans
On exhibit: ‘Made in New Orleans’ at LSU Hill Memorial Library, March 19-June 8,” inRegister

Letterform Characters
“Hill Memorial Library exhibit explores history of typeface,”  The Daily Reveille

Through the Valley of Death
“Hill Memorial Library debuts WWI exhibit,” The Daily Reveille

Investigating Sherlock
“LSU’s Hill Memorial hosts Sherlock Holmes exhibit,” The Daily Reveille

Jazz Fest 101: A Showcase of Student Oral History Research
“Hill Memorial Library displays ‘Jazz Fest 101,’ explores festival’s past,” The Daily Reveille

A Voyage to the Floating World: Japanese Illustrated Books and East-West Cultural Exchange in the Nineteenth Century
“On Exhibit: A Voyage to the Floating World,” inRegister

Advancing Scholarship & Learning for 80 Years: LSU Press and The Southern Review
“Hill Memorial Library Displays History of LSU Press, Southern Review,” The Daily Reveille

A la Militaire” – The Battle of New Orleans
“Hill Memorial opens ‘A la Militaire,'” The Daily Reveille

Cooperative Extension at LSU
“AgCenter: Louisiana resource for 100 years,”
The Advertiser


I Remember: An Art Show of Environmental Significance
“Time for oil and gas industry to come to the table on coastal restoration,” BR Business Report

The Relentless Pursuit of “Equal”
“Integration Exhibit Opens,” LSU Daily Reveille

Centuries of Style
“Style Stories,” The Advocate

“Clothing as Social History,” nola.com

Of Kin & Cane
LSU Daily Reveille

Blacks in the Red Stick
LSU Daily Reveille

Louisiana for Bibliophiles
The Advocate

Change(less): Photography and the Ephemeral Made Permanent
DIG Magazine

Recent Faculty Publications

2019

Comeaux, Dave;  Emily Frank; and Mike Waugh. “Supporting Student Success: E-books as Course Materials,” CODEX: Journal of the Louisiana Chapter of the ACRL. Volume 5, Issue 2 (Fall/Winter 2019).

O’Neill, Brittany; and  Allen LeBlanc. “Evaluating Trends in Instruction Scheduling Management: A Survey of Louisiana’s Academic Libraries,” CODEX: Journal of the Louisiana Chapter of the ACRL. Volume 5, Issue 2 (Fall/Winter 2019).

Ziegler, Scott; and Cara Key. “More Than a Pretty Interface: The Louisiana Digital Library as a Data Hub,” CODEX: Journal of the Louisiana Chapter of the ACRL. Volume 5, Issue 2 (Fall/Winter 2019).

2018

Hebert, Andrea. “Information Literacy Skills of First-Year Library and Information Science Graduate Students: An Exploratory Study,” Evidence Based Library and Information Practice Volume 13, Issue 3 (September 2018).

Miller, Marty. “Sacred vs. Profane in The Great War: A Neutral’s Indictment: Louis Raemaekers’s Use of Religious Imagery in Adoration of the Magi and Our Lady of Antwerp.” Catholic Library World, vol. 89, no. 1, Sept. 2018, pp. 20–32.

Wilder, Stanley. “Delayed Retirements and the Youth Movement among ARL Library Professionals,” Research Library Issues, no. 295 (2018).

Wilder, Stanley. “Hiring and Staffing Trends in ARL Libraries,” Research Library Issues, no. 295 (2018).

Wilder, Stanley. “Selected Demographic Trends in the ARL Professional Population,” Research Library Issues, no. 295 (2018).

Ziegler, Scott; and Richard Shrake. “PAL: Toward a Recommendation System for Manuscripts,” Information Technology and Libraries, Vol. 37, No. 3 (2018).

2017

Caminita, C.; Cook, M.; and Paster, A. (2017). Thirty years of preserving, discovering, and accessing U.S. agricultural information: Past progress and current challenges. Library Trends, 65(3), 293-315.

Dauterive, Sarah; John Bourgeois; and Sarah Simms. “How little is too little? An examination of information literacy instruction duration for freshmen.” Journal of Information Literacy, 11.1 (2017): 204-219.

Fontenot, Mitch; Emily Frank; and Andrea Hebert. “Going Where the Users Are: Three Variations on a Theme,” Louisiana Libraries, Fall 2017.

Hawk, Amanda K. “Highflying Crowdfunding: Creating a Successful Partnership with a Campus Donor,” Archival Outlook, July/August 2017: 12-13, 19. https://www.bluetoad.com/publication/?i=422988.

Hebert, Andrea; and Marty Miller. (2017). Using FSA-OWI photographs to teach information and visual literacy. Louisiana Libraries, 79(3), 19–25.

Johnson, Hayley. “#NoDAPL: Social Media, Empowerment, and Civic Participation at Standing Rock,” Library Trends, Fall 2017.

More…

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